Wednesday, 28 April 2021

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Bostock

In the the third group, wherein part of the bearer's name is shown by the charges, it is possible that Bostock makes similar play with his silver fesse having its ends cut off, for this is no true fesse, but may be designed to suggest a conventionalised stock of a tree. A very tenuous pun but worthy of consideration.




Bostock
Sable a fesse hummette Argent.  

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Spurstow of Spurstow

In the the third group, wherein part of the bearer's name is shown by the charges,the arms of Spurstow of Spurstow, who carried in his green shield three pierced molets of gold, must also be included, for his charges are spur rowels.



Spurstow of Spurstow
Arms: Quarterly
1 & 4 Vert, three mullets pierced Or
2 Argent, a lion rampant Gules [Leigh]
3 Azure crussily, and three eagles displayed Or [Alphram]

Crest: A woman's head affronte, couped below the breast proper, hair dishevelled Or.       

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Dawson

Also in the the third group, wherein part of the bearer's name is shown by the charges, we find the daws that Dawson of Nantwich painted on an engrailed bend of silver.



Dawson of Nantwich

Arms: Azure, on a bend engrailed Argent three dawes (Jackdaw's)  Sable [Dawson]

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Troutbeck

Lingering for a while within the third group, wherein part of the bearer's name is shown by the charges, I am rather fond of the fretted trout of Troutbeck.



Troutbeck
Arms: Azure, three trouts fretted in triangle Argent

Regular readers of my weblog may recall that I have written previously on the arms of Troutbeck, the first to report on an apparent lack of any fail-safe checking mechanism between the Court of the Lord Lyon and The College of Arms when these ancient English arms were granted, by The Lord Lyon in Scotland, to the Catholic Diocese of Aberdeen (granted 1990) and the second to report that The National Archives had an exhibition titled "Representing Blackness" when one image which caught my eye was that of a pedigree of Sir Robert Troutbeck.



Tuesday, 27 April 2021

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Bulkeley

Perhaps on safer ground are those which fit nicely into the the more easily explained third group, wherein part of the bearer's name is shown by the charges. Into this group fits quite nicely the ancient coat of the three black bulls' heads of Bulkeley.




Bulkeley
Sable, a chevron between three bulls' heads cabossed Argent.   

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Leche of Carden

To this second group we can add the crests of Leche of Carden and Leche of Nantwich, who differenced, the one with a crescent on a crescent, the other with a ring, the old family crest of an arm coming out of a crown, the hand grasping the serpent of Aesculapius, patron of all leeches.



Leech of Cawarden, al's Carden
Arms: Ermine, on a chief indented Gules three ducal coronets Or, a crescent on a crescent for difference.
Crest: Out of a ducal coronet Or, a cubit arm erect proper, grasping a snake entwined of the first, a crescent on a crescent for difference. 



Leeche of Nantwich
Arms: Quarterly -
1 & 4 Ermine, on a chief indented Gules an annulet between two ducal coronets Or.
2 Azure, on a bend engrailed Argent three dawes (Jackdaw's)  Sable [Dawson]
3 Quarterly 1 & 4 [Vert] a cross engrailed Ermine a mullet for difference [Wettenhall]
                  2 & 3 [Vert] a bend Ermine, a mullet for difference [Wettenhall, Ancient]

Crest: Out of a ducal coronet Or, a cubit arm erect proper, grasping a snake entwined of the first, an annulet for difference                   

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Shalcross of Stowshaw

Perhaps to our more modern eyes not entirely of the first division, the arms of Shalcross of Stowshaw, a cadet of Shalcross of Shalcross in Derbyshire, made his pun less easily; nevertheless his saltire cross between four golden rings* in red is a fair example of the humour which the medieval armorists did not disdain.


Shalcross of Stowshaw
Arms: Gules, a saltire between four annulets Or, a crescent for difference.
Crest: A martlet Or, holding in the beak a cross formee fitchee Gules, a crescent for difference.  

* For my reader who still hasn't got the pun, in the marriage vows, where rings are exchanged, substitute "I will" for "I shall" .

Sunday, 25 April 2021

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Corona of Adlington

We remain in our first division of puns to make mention of the arms of Corona of Adlington, who perhaps missed his chance to use only one crown but nevertheless still maintained the pun because he bore a golden chevron and three golden crowns in a blue field.  




Corona (Adlington, co. Chester): Azure a chevron between three ducal coronets Or.



Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Croxton

One of my favourite puns, not included in the Visitations of Chester but recorded in Burke's G.A. and recorded in  The Vale Royal of England, first published by Daniel King in 1656, is that of Croxton who placed two tuns between three crosses to illustrate his name.  



Croxton (co. Chester and Ireland)

Argent, on a fesse Azure between three crosses crosslet fitchee Sable two tuns Or.       

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Cotton of Cotton

Continuing with the first division, we would be missing a trick if we did not add Cotton of Cotton who placed a silver chevron between the three hanks of cotton that indicate his name.


Cotton of Cotton
Azure, a chevron between three cotton shanks Argent.   


Saturday, 24 April 2021

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Bird of Clopton

To the arms of Delves and Bonbury of Stanney, in that first division, we may now add Bird of Clopton who bore on silver a cross paty between four martlets all coloured red, with a canton differently coloured for each branch of this family. 

Bird of Clopton
Arms: Argent, a cross flory between four martlets Gules, a canton Azure.





Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Bonbury of Stanney

To the arms of Delves, mentioned previously as a characteristic example of those arms which combine other charges with objects of the same name as the family, we may add those of Bonbury of Stanney, in whose silver chess-rooks we see three good castles.

[The name Bunbury (Bonbury) derives from the Old English personal name Buna, and the burh, which means "fortress". Bon of course is French for "good".]

Bonbury (Bunbury)

Argent on a bend Sable three chess rooks of the field.



Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Brooke of Leighton

Fitting easily into our first group is the crest of Brooke of Leighton, which naturally is a brock.



Brooke of Leighton
Arms: - Quarterly
1 and 4 Or, a cross engrailed per pale Gules and Sable
2 and 3 Argent, a chevron Sable between three bucks' heads cabossed Gules [Parker]

Crest: A brock or badger Argent [proper]        



Thursday, 22 April 2021

Anthony Hough, Gentleman, 1605

 The latest addition to the Funeral Certificates series:

Anthony Hough, Gentleman, 1605.
Arms: Quarterly 1st and 4th, Argent, a bend Sable; 2nd and 3rd, Argent, a wolf's head erased Sable.


Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Starkey of Stretton

The Starkeys of Stretton and the various branches that came off the parent house had nought to do but to show the bird of their name in black on silver.


Starkey of Stretton
Arms: Quarterly -
1 & 4 Argent, a stork close Sable, beaked and legged Gules
2 Sable, a leopard's face Or, jessant de lis Argent [Morley]
3 Argent, a chevron engrailed between three garbs Sable [Darby]  



Starkey of Stretton of the Overhall
Arms: Quarterly -
1 & 4 Argent, a stork close Sable, beaked and legged Gules
2 & 3 Argent, a griffin segreant Sable       


Starkey of Olton and Darley
Arms: Quarterly -
1 & 4 Argent, a stork close Sable, beaked and legged Gules, in dexter chief a crescent for difference of the last.
2 Quarterly Vert and Gules, a lion rampant Argent [Olton]
3 Argent, a chevron sable between three wrens Gules [Wrenbury]

Crest: A stork's head erased per pale Argent and Sable, holding in the beak Gules a snake Vert.            


Starkey of Wrenbury
Arms: Quarterly -
1 & 4 Argent, a stork close Sable, beaked and legged Gules, in dexter chief a crescent for difference of the last.
2 Quarterly Vert and Gules, a lion rampant Argent [Olton]
3 Argent, a chevron sable between three wrens Gules [Wrenbury]
Over all a mullet for difference (for third son)          



Certificate of Robert Earl of Essex concerning Richard Jenyns

I stumbled upon this by accident whilst looking for something else. It has an heraldic interest (from the Records of the Cheshire Quarter Sessions).



Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Newton of Pownall

Newton of Pownall fell upon his pun more easily when he displayed a fine new tun of gold in his green escutcheon.


Newton of Pownall: Vert, a tun in fess Or.  


Tun: noun; a large beer or wine cask. 

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Harthill

Another pun which isn't difficult to solve is that of Harthill who placed a red hart on a green hill in his shield of silver. 

Harthill: Argent, on a mount Vert, a buck couchant Gules. 



Wednesday, 21 April 2021

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Griffin of Batherton

Staying in the first division of heraldic puns we find Griffin of Cattenhall and Griffin of Barterton who charged their silver shield with a black griffin. No explanation needed there.


Griffin of Barterton

Arms: Argent, a griffin segreant Sable. 

Many Happy Returns

 Happy Birthday Your Majesty.



The Royal Arms of England

The Royal Arms of the United Kingdom [English Version]
Images courtesy of Wikipedia



John Hope, Gentleman, 1633.

 John Hope, Gentleman, 1633.

Son and heir to George Hope of Dodleston. He died in his father's lifetime.

Arms: Quarterly of nine: 1, Argent, a chevron engrailed Sable between three birds [storks?*] ... beaked and legged Gules; 2, Gules, three uncorns' heads couped Or [Paris]; 3, Azure, a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis Or, on a canton .... two roundles ... [?]; 4, Argent, two bars Gules, each charged with three bezants, a crescent for difference [Martin co. York]; 5, Per bend sinister Ermine and Ermines, a lion rampant Or [Edwards]; 6, Azure, a lion rampant Argent, within a bordure of the second; 7, Or, a lion rampant Gules [Wale?]; 8, Or, a lion rampant Gules within a bordure of the second; 9, Azure, three boars passant in pale Argent; over the first three quarterings a label of three points Vert.

*In the Funeral Certificate for Mrs. Katherine Davenport, 1634, the birds are recorded as herons or stalks [storks].

I have yet to identify the quarterings and until I do, there are a number of uncertainties about this achievement. In the first quarter, although the arms recorded for Mrs Katherine Davenport have the birds recorded as herons or storks, the nearest match in Burke's G.A. is that of Hope (Grangefield co. Derby) Argent, a chevron engrailed Sable between three Cornish choughs proper. In quarter three, the tinctures of the canton and the two roundels are not specified so I have made a complete guess until I can research the matter further.  


Tuesday, 20 April 2021

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Birches of Birches

Staying for a while in the first and best group we next must come to Birches of Birches whose achievement is parted chevron-wise, with colours of gold in the chief and green in the foot, and placed therein three sprigs of a birch tree counter coloured.

Birches of Birches

Arms: Per chevron Or and Vert, three sprigs of birch counterchanged.


  

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Bird of Yowley

Bird of Yowley and Bird of Crew
Arms: Quarterly 1 & 4 Per pale Argent and Or, an eagle displayed Sable.
2 & 3 Argent, an ass's head erased Sable [Hocknell]       


By now, it should be obvious that any attempt at classification will show that not all examples of canting arms are of equal merit; some are simple and obvious whilst others are tenuous at best and obscure rather than obvious. Some names do not lend themselves so readily as others to this treatment, and of course this form of humour may not have appealed with equal force to every man whose name might have suggested the devising of a canting coat. Nevertheless, in our first group we can count Bird of Yowley, whose parted shield of silver and gold is charged with a black eagle.


While we are discussing the arms of Bird of Yowley, we may as well touch on the 2nd and 3rd quarters of Hocknell. The black ass's head which Hocknell of Hocknell bore on silver is not a very obvious pun until we remember that the humble ass might quite reasonably be regarded as a little hackney.

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Praers and Snelston

 Praers

Gules, a scythe Argent.    


 

In our last group we shall find the humour beaten even thinner still when the name of the bearer only hints delicately at something which the charge in the shield has to do with. Praers with his silver scythe on red carries an object which seems to have little suggestion of any pun however, when we remember that he too is of the band of punsters, and that the charge in his knightly shield is the tool wherewith his meadows were mown, we may be able, stretching a point, to see some pun. Snelston of Snelston, who bears the same arms but differently coloured a black scythe on silver makes his arms pun more closely on his name; for the first three letters of it are a hint at the word sneyd, which is the term for the handle of a scythe.

Snelston
Argent, a scythe erect Sable.      



Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Downes of Downes and Tarhall

Downes of Downes and Tarhall

Arms: Sable, a buck lodged Argent.


Into the fifth group we can bring together the arms of families whose names do nothing more than suggest something which the charge is or does. The humour, my reader will note, is growing more subtle as we proceed with our classification; but there is an obvious appropriateness, for example, in the silver hart  lying down which Downes of Downes painted on his black shield. 

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Calveley of the Lea

George Calveley of the Ley

Arms: Quarterly -

1 & 4 Argent, a fesse Gules between three calves passant Sable [Calveley] 

2 Argent, on a bend sinister Gules nine annulets interlaced in threes, Or [Hawberk]

3 Sable, two hinds counter trippant Argent [Cottingham]

Crest: Out of a ducal coronet Or a calf's head Sable.   


  

Continuing our sojourn around the puns in Cheshire armorial bearings, a fourth group might consist of shields whose charges are objects, the name whereof is part only of the bearer's name, combined with an ordinary. The arms of George Calveley of the Lea, as one example, would fit into this category, with arms of three black calves in a silver field having a red fesse between them, while his crest of a black calf's head erased and collared with a golden crown is equally an example of canting heraldry. 

Calveley

Argent, a fesse Gules between three calves Sable.     



Wednesday, 14 April 2021

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Millington of Millington

 Millington of Millington                                                                                                                        Azure, three millstones Argent each charged with a millrind Sable.  




The third group of pun would contain shields of arms in which part only of the names of the owners is indicated by the charges. Of this type are coats like that of Millington of Millington, who placed three silver millstones in his blue shield.



Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Delves of Doddington

Delves
Argent, a chevron Gules fretty Or between three delves (sods of turf) Sable.          



In what might be considered a slightly less obvious group might be placed those coats in which charges whose names are the whole names of the bearers are combined with other charges. Delves of Doddington, so pleased to add the chevron of the Audley colours between the three black delves in his silver shield, could be included in this type of pun; here we see both the play on his name and his proclamation of his kinship with that Staffordshire squire whom James Audley delighted to honour for his valorous work at Poitiers.

Tuesday, 13 April 2021

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire

We all like a good heraldic pun and one of my favourites is the arms of Toft. 



The Tofts of Toft, a very ancient Cheshire house, charged their silver shield with a black chevron and three text T's of the same, the T oft repeated being an exact representation of their name. 

Addendum:
Extracts from Ormerod's History of Chester illustrating that the original Toft of Toft coat did not have the chevron.






Shotwick and Hockenhull

Having just started the emblazonment of the arms of Mrs. Margaret Hockenhull, late wife of John Hokenhull of Prenton," 1613, I noted that there is no tincture given for the field of the Shotwick quarter and that the Hockenhull arms are noted as being in the 2nd and 3rd quarters rather than the 1st and 4th. 

The first port of call (for the tincture of the shield) is, as always, Burke's but there is no entry for Shotwick. So, I looked for what I could find on Shotwick Hall and came across details of these arms in the Transactions of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire, 12th March 1914, Shotwick Hall.


"Transactions Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire  12th March 1914

Shotwick Hall

In the parlour, to the right, there is a carving over the mantelpiece, disfigured by successive coats of paint ; in the centre are the arms of Hockenhull of Hockenhull and Shotwick, with helm and mantlet, viz. Crest on a wreath, party per fesse, Argent and Or, a buck's head and neck erased, attired Or, pierced through the nostrils with a dart in bend of the last, feathered Argent, barbed Azure. 

Arms Quarterly, 1 and 4, a plain cross [Shotwick] ; 2 and 3, Argent, an ass's head erased Sable [Hockenhull].


In regard to the Shotwick arms, nothing is obtainable at Heralds' College, but from the funeral certificate of " Mrs. Margaret Hocknell, late wife of John Hokenhull of Prenton," 1613, they appear to have been a plain cross Sable, and these arms are shown in the first and fourth quarters of an achievement over a mantelpiece in the present Hall, with the date 1662, Hockenhull occupying the second and third quarters (see p. 68). The placing of the arms of Shotwick in the first and fourth quarters is curious, especially as the Hockenhulls did not sell their manor of Hockenhull until some fifty years later, and perhaps argues that they considered Shotwick the more important possession. In earlier times, it is true, the great folk regarded their quarterings less as marks of identity and evidences of descent than as emblems of their seigniories, placing the most important first; but the present instance seems a very late survival of that practice. Perhaps, however, the arms were copied from an old seal. In Scotland quarterings also implied the possession of lands. This was so much the case that, though the third Marquess of Montrose (d. 1684) married Lady Christian, younger daughter and co-heiress in blood of John Leslie, Duke of Rothes, yet, as she did not share in her father's lands, her arms have not been quartered in the Montrose escutcheon as they would be now. In foreign coats quarterings are often employed to denote the possession of fiefs acquired in other ways than by marriage, e.g. by bequest or purchase, or even the jus expectationis. In Harl. MS. 2187, fo. 66b, there are depicted the crest and coat of Hockenhull, the latter quartering 2 and 3 Argent a cross Sable ; the cross is faintly drawn in pencil as voided, but the tinctures are denoted by the letters A and S in ink. In Harl. MS. 1535, fo. 35b, a shield is reserved for Shotwick, but no arms are filled in."

Heraldic Puns abound in Cheshire - Lupus

Hugh Lupus

Azure, a wolf's head erased Argent.

The famous arms attributed to Hugh Lupus are perhaps in the first division of heraldic puns even though this great Domesday earl was not really armigerous in the sense in which we understand the term however, once we accept that these arms are attributed, they must stand as a most dignified representation of an heraldic pun 

Attributed coat of arms of Hugh d'Avranches, Earl of Chester (Hugh Lupus)


Sunday, 11 April 2021

Richard Grosvenor, Esquire, 1619.

 Richard Grosvenor, Esquire, 1619.




Arms: Quarterly of thirteen coats: 1, Azure, a garb Or [Grosvenor]; 2, Sable, a cross flory Argent [Pulford (the cross should possibly be patonce)]; 3, Azure, three pheasants Or [Fesant]; 4, Quarterly Argent and Sable, a cross flory counterchanged [Eaton]; 5, Vert, three stumps of trees, couped and eradicated Argent [Stockton]; 6, Argent, a bend Sable between three pellets [Cotton]; 7, Azure, an eagle displayed Argent [Cotton]; 8, Gules, three swords erect, two and one Argent, hilts Or [Waldeshef of Boylston]; 9, Or, six eagles displayed, three, two and one Sable, a canton Ermine [Basing]; 10, Argent, three birds (?falcons), close Gules; 11, Sable three owls Or; 12, Azure, two bars Argent [Venables*]; 13, Or, a fess Azure [Vernon].
Crest: A talbot statant Or.   

* Azure, two bars Argent recorded as the arms of Wilbraham in record of the arms of Grosvenor of Eaton in the Visitations of Cheshire 1663 however, the arms of Wilbraham have a canton upon which is a wolf's head.

** This coat also features in the arms of Grosvenor of Eaton in the 1663 Visitations however, the trees are recorded as Or.



Saturday, 10 April 2021

Dame Elizabeth Grosvenor, 1628.

 Funeral Certificates

Dame Elizabeth Grosvenor, 1628.



Daughter and sole heir to Sir Peter Warberton of Grafton [1st husband Sir Thomas Stanley of Auderley. 2nd husband Sir Richard Grosvenor of Eaton]

Arms, Quarterly of four: 1, Quarterly, Argent and Gules, in the second and third a fret Or, in the first quarter an ermine spot; over all a crescent for difference; 2, Argent, a chevron between three cormorants Sable; 3, Argent, two chevronels Gules on a canton of the second, a mullet Or; 4, Barry wavy of six Argent and Sable, a chief per pale Ermine and Gules, the latter charged with a fleur-de-lis Or; a crescent Sable for difference.

[I have not rendered these arms in a lozenge]    

The first quarter is for Dutton* but bears an additional charge of  fleur-de-lis in the first quarter as well as the cadency mark. The second quarter is for Warburton and the third is Warburton Ancient, or Orreby. I have yet to identify the fourth quarter.  

*I received a reminder from Richard Lichten of a note by Clive Cheeseman (Coat of Arms, Journal of the Heraldry Society, Volume II 2006) that the Warburtons claimed male-line descent from Adam of Dutton, who had half the manor of Warburton in frank marriage with Agnes daughter of Roger son of Alured, the other half being granted to him by the Prior of St John of Jerusalem in 1189; see also G . Ormerod, History of the Count y Palatine and City of Chester (3 vols., London 1819), vol. 1, pp. 430-1. The family therefore frequently displayed the arms of Dutton in first place, sometimes adding a crescent to indicate that Adam was a second son.     

Friday, 9 April 2021

Edward Dutton, Esquire, 1620.

 I've been putting this one off for a while now because it has twelve quarters but having a few moments to myself (ha ... more like hours!) this afternoon decided to take the bull by the horns. 

Edward Dutton, Esquire, 1620.
Arms: Quarterly of twelve; 1, Quarterly Argent and Gules, in the second and third a fret Or; 2, Argent, on a bend Gules, three escarbuncles Or; 3, Vert, a cross engrailed Ermine; 4, Or, a saltire Sable; 5, Azure, an estoile of eight points issuing from between the horns of a crescent Argent; 6, Or, on a fesse Azure, three garbs of the field; 7, Azure, a chevron between three garbs Or; 8, Ermine, on a chevron Gules, three escallops Argent; 9, Or, a cinquefoil pierced Sable; 10, Azure, a garb Or; 11, Sable, a cross flory Argent; 12, Azure, three pheasants Or.

Crest: A plume of five ostrich feathers, Argent, Azure, Or, Vert, and Gules, quills Gold. 


1. Quarterly Argent and Gules, in the second and third a fret Or [Dutton]
2. Argent, on a bend Gules 3 escarbuncles Or [Thorneton]
3. Vert, a cross engrailed Ermine [Kingsley]
4. Or, a saltire Sable [Helsby]
5. Azure, an estoile issuant from the horns of a crescent Argent [Minshull].
6. Or, on a fesse Azure, three garbs of the field, [Vernon]
7. Azure, a chevron between three garbs Or. [Hatton]
8. Ermine, on a chevron Gules, three escallops Argent [Grove]
9. Or, a cinquefoil pierced Sable. [Vernon]
10. Azure, a garb Or. [Grosvenor]
11. Sable, a cross fleury Argent [Eaton]
12. Azure, three pheasants Or.[Fesant]


H.R.H. Prince Phillip, Duke of Edinburgh "The Queen's Strength".



10 June 1921 – 9 April 2021

What a man.



Coat of Arms of HRH Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born 1921, died 2021) granted in 1949 to Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark (Sir Philip Mountbatten) consort to Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. In 1947 the Prince was made Duke of Edinburgh, Earl of Merioneth and Baron Greenwich by King George VI. The coat of arms represents his lineage as a Prince of Greece and Denmark on his paternal side and his descent of the Mountbatten family on his maternal side.

Image of the arms courtesy of Sodacan.

Thursday, 1 April 2021

Oh Dear, it's all a load of Bull

This image has just appeared on Facebook and it's raised a few questions. 


The owner of these arms, a Mr. Paul Mark Moffat, describes himself (on his Facebook page) as  "Maestro Comandante The Right Honorable Count Paul M Moffat 10th Baron of Bulwell".


According to an article written by Robert Mellors, "Old Nottingham suburbs: then and now [Bulwell] (1914)", there is (or was then) a Court Leet for the Manor of Bulwell but it was owned by Nottingham Corporation and it is highly unlikely that said Corporation would have sold a barony of Bulwell when it is simply a manor.  "A local Court of great antiquity still survives at Bulwell, called "The View of Frankpledge, Court Leet, and Great Court Baron," of the lord of the Manor, which lordship is now vested in Sir Edward Fraser and Sir John T. McCraith, being the nominees of the Corporation of Nottingham. Mr. Arthur Browne, as Steward of the Manor for the last twenty-three years, has the custody of the Records, which date from 1723, the earlier part being in Latin, and older records having been lost."

It seems to me that this particular barony is, let's say, a tad dubious.



There is no doubt that the creation of this digital image by Quentin Peacock is, in itself quite beautiful however, keeping it heraldic, the armiger should have been informed that baronies, particularly English feudal baronies (quite apart from the fact that there is a strong argument to say that they don't exist) never had arms of their own and so a feudal baron would never display arms of pretence in this way and in any case, English feudal barons never had any "additaments" such as the chapeau so the escutcheon of pretence would not be ensigned by one. Setting aside the escutcheon of pretence, which ought not be there, the actual shield is excellent and there is no reason why the crest should not feature a chapeau in the way that it does. Remove the escutcheon of pretence and it would have five stars (no criticism at all of the artwork).

In his other Facebook page (why do people assign to themselves the status of "Public Figure"?) he lends the impression that he would rather like the coronet of a baron of the UK Peerage!





 

Maltese Heraldry still in limbo but it's happening slowly but surely

  The arms of the Office of Chief Herald of Arms of Malta (an office in progress) Well, now that we have finally seen the creation, in late ...

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